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I, Virginia Bergman, pledge not to vote for a male presidential candidate in 2016 just because he's male.

Thursday, July 3, 2014

July 4, 2014: sex trafficking, enslaving young girls in America

Photo via LarryKingLive.com.

The 4th of July commemorates the signing of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. You recall that’s when America declared its independence from Great Britain. 

It’s also customary on the 4th of July to celebrate our constitutionally guaranteed freedoms, supposedly applicable to all Americans of whatever race, religion, ethnic background, or gender.

In light of the above, why then, on July 4, 2014, are hundreds of young girls in our country enslaved by sex traffickers?  

One underlying reason for the existence of sex trafficking today in America is that our nation has yet to pass the Equal Rights Amendment, first submitted to Congress in 1923, which guarantees equal rights for women. It’s not surprising that injustices against women in the areas of equal pay for equal work and atrocities like sex trafficking continue in 2014.

Before setting off those fireworks tomorrow, pause for a few minutes, and read below how cruelly young women in this country continue to be enslaved by greedy, misogynist pimps. After the festivities this weekend, you might send off an email to your Congressperson urging a further crackdown on sex traffickers and supporting the long delayed passage of the Equal Rights Amendment.

From the Women’s Funding Network:

The following essay is one of our most-referenced resources from a past initiative of the Women’s Funding Network. We partnered with women’s funds and foundations across the United States as part of a national campaign to research, prevent and end domestic minor sex trafficking. Women’s funds and foundations are often the first to create, support, and promote the latest solutions to major social problems, and our members’ response to this issue was no exception. The Atlanta Women’s Foundation, Minnesota Foundation for Women and New York Women’s Foundation, for example, were key partners and conveners of coalitions advancing public policy change and a system of care for sexually exploited girls in their communities.

While the original campaign involving Women’s Funding Network is now complete, the work on this issue continues among our member funds and foundations around the country.

Take Action on Sex Trafficking

To learn more about how you can stop sex trafficking, visit A Future. Not A Past.

If you know someone that needs help, call the Dream Catchers Hotline 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 1-888-229-3339.


Essay: Enslaved in America


By Tina Frundt

The pimps who are trafficking young women and girls on the street in the U.S. have a great marketing tool: the media.

When we hear the words “sex trafficking,” as Americans we immediately think of women and children overseas who are being forced into the sex trade or who are brought into the United States for the purpose of sexual exploitation. We don’t usually think closer to home — Americans trafficked by Americans. But I want you to think about young women and even girls that you have seen late at night when you come home from work or a social event. Maybe you have seen them in the streets in short dresses and spike heels. You turn your heads to look away. We do not look at the faces of these young women and girls who are forced to be out in the street. Maybe we think this is what they want to do or they wouldn’t be out there. Maybe it is easier to believe that it is an empowering choice they have than face the harsh reality of child sexual abuse, physical and mental abuse, and the pimps that prey on the young women and girls.

To understand all aspects of sex trafficking in the United States, you have to open your mind and let go of what you have seen or heard on television. You need to let go of the media’s portrayal of the “joys” of street prostitution, and open your eyes to the violence and control the pimps and sex traffickers exercise over their victims, who are mostly girls and young women.

ECPAT USA (End Child Prostitution, Child Pornography and Trafficking of Children for Sexual Purposes)’, an Anti-Trafficking agency, states that the average age of entry into street prostitution is between 12 and 14 years old, though there have been cases of girls as young as 9 years old.

I was 14 years old when I was forced into prostitution. Like many teens at that age, finding my own identity and defying my parents were top on my list. So when a man came into my life and showered me with attention and listened to me when I complained about my parents, I did not think twice that he was ten years my senior. After all, he said I was mature for my age and told me I understood him better than anyone his own age. Little did I know, he was laying down the seeds of manipulation. It did not matter what my parents said, to me they did not understand me and he was the only one that “got me”. After six months, I thought I loved him, at least that is what he told me, so I did what I thought my heart was telling me and ran away to be with him. We ended up in Cleveland, Ohio. He told me we were going to meet the rest of the family.

I had no idea the “family” meant myself and three other girls. After I was introduced to the “family,” I was told what my role would be. I would go out to “work” that night and bring him back the money. How else would we build our dream home? He assured me he would always love me no matter what, but he needed to know how much I loved him by making sure I would do anything for him.

Later that evening, his friends came by the motel. At first, he told me to have sex with someone. I did not want to so his friends raped me. Afterwards, he said “that wouldn’t have happened if I would have just listened to him at first.” I blamed myself instead of being angry at him for being raped. I was angry at myself for not listening to him in the first place. After that, he picked my clothes out, told me what to wear, what to say, how to walk, what to say to “Johns” and how much money I was to bring back to him. He then forced me to go out into the streets.


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